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Toric Contact Lenses - Astigmatism

Toric Contacts for Astigmatism Contact Lenses Now Available For Astigmatism
The last time I was at the eye doctor my ophthalmologist confirmed I have an astigmatism. In the past I always assumed this meant I couldn't wear contact lenses. At least, that is what I was told many years ago. At the time I was devastated and begrudgingly accepted the idea I would have to wear glasses forever.

Thanks to changes in modern technology however, you can now wear soft or regular contacts even if you have an astigmatism.

A new kind of contact lens is now available for people with astigmatism, called toric contacts. Typically anyone with astigmatism can now use soft contacts, even disposable ones, even if they have astigmatism. So what are they and how do they work?

Toric Vs. Regular Contact Lenses
Toric lenses like regular contact lenses are made of the same soft or rigid materials. The lens in Toric contacts however, offers two curvatures at different angels to compensate for astigmatism and for either hyperopia (farsightedness) or myopia (nearsightedness). Toric lenses also provide a unique mechanism for stabilizing your vision while moving, so your vision remains crisp as you shift from object to object.

Toric lenses are moderately priced, though they do cost more than traditional contact lenses. Typically your eye care professional will spend more time with you when fitting toric versus traditional contact lenses. Many consumers however, are willing to overlook the small increase in price to wear contacts instead of eye glasses.

Do All People With Astigmatism Need Toric Lenses?
Not everyone with astigmatism will need toric lenses. In fact if you have only a small astigmatism you may be able to get away with regular contact lenses or soft contact lenses. In some cases the cornea uniquely conforms to the shape of the lens, allowing you to wear regular or soft lenses with higher power vision correction to compensate for your astigmatism.

The process of determining whether you need toric or regular lenses however, may take some time. You will need to visit a competent eye care professional to help you evaluate whether regular or toric contact lenses will work best for you.

Can I Buy Color and Disposable Toric Lenses?
Thanks to modern technology most consumers can enjoy a wide range of selection when it comes to toric lenses. You can usually select from color, disposable or regular toric lenses. Some consumers even have the option of buying multifocal toric lenses.

Not sure which is best for you? Consult with your eye care professional. Typically most people with astigmatism can choose frequent replacement lenses or disposable lenses if they want.

Like regular and soft contacts, toric lenses also come in many color varieties. So if you are feeling bold and adventurous you can also buy color disposable lenses and have a little fun while wearing your contacts.

People with presbyopia can even select multifocal toric lenses. Usually if you buy multifocal brands however, you'll have to opt for non disposable lenses. Multifocals usually come as RGP or regular gas permeable contact lenses.

Are Contacts Right For You?
I have always considered the possibility of contacts. Today I am less worried about wearing glasses and more interested in changing my eye color for grins. I have astigmatism coupled with hyperopia and mild presbyopia, but at least now I know I can try contact lenses if I want to. The only downside of contacts?

Getting over my phobia of putting anything in my eye. Fortunately for the time being, I am enjoying multiple pairs of eyeglasses. I now view eyeglasses as a fun way to spice up your appearance and coordinate your attire. It's nice to know however, I do have the option of trying contact lenses in the future if I can get over the fear I have of placing foreign objects in my eye. Anyone have any tips on overcoming that let me know!

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