Eye Doctor Directory
Contact Lens
 

   Find An Eye Doctor

   LASIK

   Eye Glasses

   Contact Lenses

   Eye Problems

   Eye Doctor Articles

   Eye Colors | Eye Makeup

   Pink Eye | Eye Twitching

   Child Eyes | Sun Glasses

   Glaucoma | Cataracts

   Eye Vitamin & Nutrition

   Macular Degeneration

   Contact Glasses

   Eye Care and Health
   Resources | Contact Us


Join us on Facebook





   

Shifty Eyes Are Just Fine

Shifty Eyes Do your eyes constantly move from one place to the next? Maybe they jump here, there then everywhere. It's natural for some people to have shifty eyes. Did you know that everyone's eyes jump a little, at least some of the time?

Our eyes constantly adjust to our environment; they are the least likely of all our body parts to sit still. We usually don't notice this. Typically our eyes move to and fro without a care in the world. But have you ever stopped to think what makes our eyes work? How is it our eyes know when to move when we want them to?

The Neuron Connection
Our eyes move just like any other part of our body, instinctively. A recent study by the University of Pittsburgh and the National Eye Institute explain that some people's eyes however, shirt involuntarily. The researchers believe it has something to do with the circuitry of the eyes and their link to the brain.

Studies of the eye's circuitry are not new. In 1950 Roger Sperry, a Nobel laureate, suggested the brain sends an internal copy of a signal when it commands the eye to move. This copy goes to the visual system. Later scientists showed that this discharge may result in sudden changes in the eyes or in the receptive field.

The latest study, published in Nature, suggest there are receptive fields in the cortex of the brain that shift resulting from the discharge the brain sends to the visual system when the eyes move.

Scientists are not yet done researching this phenomenon however. In the future researchers plan to start testing the visual stability theory. This will help decide whether receptive fields in the visual cortex or in the brain are responsible for visual stability. Their findings could help those with "shifty" eyes. Meanwhile, it seems there is nothing wrong with those with shifty eyes. It's a natural part of living.

Bookmark This Page

Share |



Custom Search


   
Sitemap |  Copyright 2006 - EyeDoctorGuide.com - All rights reserved.